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Home - Use - Aromatic copals - Linaloe


Copals in Mexico

Linaloe (Bursera linanoe)

Its Nahuatl name literally means “flowery copal”, but more figuratively xochitl (flower) is an adjective meaning fine or delicate. Lináloe, the common name most widely used in Mexico, comes from the latin lignum, wood and aloe, oil.

The earliest taxonomic reference to this species was made by the Mexican botanist Pablo la Llave in 1834, who named the plant Amyris linanoe, a genus of the citrus family. These names all tell us of an essential oil of lemon-scented wood.





Ilustración: Rafael Ruíz
Información geográfica: Claudia Aguilar
Diseño: Rosalba Becerra

The many different names in common usage reveal the cultural importance of this plant: linanoé, Inamé, inanué, olinalué, ulinalué and ulinoé. The linaloe is relatively widespread however, their ecological requirements are special: soils derived from volcanic rock with an aspect that gives them some protection from the sun. Although once abundant in certain regions, they were over-exploited and today there are few trees. Plantations and reforestation have been insufficient to rebuild the populations..

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